AngryAngry

‘Mad Skills’: Watch These Rupert Longshoremen Load Raw Logs Onto An Outbound Freighter

New video is a ‘tribute’ to Longshoreman ILWU local 505.

We’re willing to bet that most people have no idea of the hard work and expertise that goes into getting logs onto freighters so they can be shipped to buyers in other places. But local drone operator Northcoast Drone sure does.    

“This video is a tribute to the hard working men and women of the ILWU 505 Longshoreman loading logs onto a freighter for export,” he says of new footage from Prince Rupert he just posted. “These folks have some mad skills walking on the logs and rigging the lines.”

We at Skeena Strong note that while these may be raw logs being shipped overseas, the mad skills are local. Watch the video here

- ADVERTISEMENT -

- ADVERTISEMENT -

Written by Skeena Strong

What do you think?

- ADVERTISEMENT -

6 Comments

Leave a Reply
  1. Just how long do you figure Skeena will remain strong at this shipping rate, if it takes 140-250 years to grow those trees on that boat, and we ship boat loads off every week, how long will BC stay strong shipping offshore?
    Industry tells us they plant 2-3 trees for every one they ‘harvest’, is that deciduous trees too, is that 2-3 trees re-planted for all the trees they harvest then burn as mistakes, and overcuts in a slash pile, so do all those 2-3 trees actually survive? Or is industry boasting and optimistic?
    Who is counting, who is monitoring, who is going back after 10-30 years to see if those trees are thriving?
    Now we are down to 3rd growth, 35-year rotations on the coast, how many MORE trees ( saplings void of heartwood) will we have to cut down to fill those boats now, it’s a totally unsustainable industry, and we all know it, govt and cartels are in deep denial, all the way to the bank while ‘BC taxpayers keep subsidizing and paying the price of externalities in our crown forests, floods, dirty drinking water, lost tourism opportunities( where are the orca and salmon?), missing caribou… biodiversity loss… cultural cedars….Is Skeena strong …but for how long, better put those skills to training/use elsewhere, soon there may be no trees to move?

Leave a Reply

Your email address will not be published. Required fields are marked *

- ADVERTISEMENT -

Investigation Into Kitimat Tugboat Tragedy Expands As Petition Tops 10k Signatures

‘Hanging In The Balance’: BC Prawners Fear DFO Could Kill The Industry